Netizens cry foul over Comelec's illegal posters list

ILLEGAL POSTER. Under Republic Act No. 9006 or the Fair Elections Act, campaign posters should measure no more than 2 feet by 3 feet. Screenshot from Twitter/COMELEC

ILLEGAL POSTER. Under Republic Act No. 9006 or the Fair Elections Act, campaign posters should measure no more than 2 feet by 3 feet.

Screenshot from Twitter/COMELEC

MANILA, Philippines – Commission on Election (Comelec) Commissioner Rowena Guanzon posted a list of senatorial candidates who had illegal posters as of February 13, but her list was met with dissent from social media users. (READ: What to expect as the 2019 campaign period for national bets begins)

The list, posted on Thursday, February 14 on her Twitter account, did not include candidates like Bong Go, Bato dela Rosa, Bong Revilla, and Imee Marcos, they said. (IN NUMBERS: Candidates for Senate 2019)

Where is the name of the selfie king? Nagkalat ang poster nia may katabi pang pangit na itago natin sa pangalang rodrigo — yourbestbro (@yourbestbro1) February 15, 2019


Bong Go, Bato dela Rosa, Bong Revilla & Imee Marcos are not on your list. Special treatment? — Garrett Alberto (@mr_boomskie) February 16, 2019


COMELEC: Bong Go, Bato dela Rosa, Bong Revilla & Imee Marcos were not on your list. Their faces are all over the country. From billboards to poster on lampposts, trees and just about every corner. You want netizens to help you? You and your people must be blind. — aksyon_na_kabataan (@aksyonNkabataan) February 15, 2019


These candidates are known to have illegal posters and have even been called out by the official Comelec Twitter account.

Oversized #NLE2019 campaign poster installed in a flyover, a public place pursuant to Sec. 7(f)4 of Resolution No. 10488, located near the Meycauayan Exit of NLEX. Send us your pictures of illegal campaign materials (with date/time, location) and use #SumbongsaCOMELEC. pic.twitter.com/izfDZbbghb — COMELEC (@COMELEC) February 15, 2019

Illegal #NLE2019 campaign posters in street/lamp posts, a public place pursuant to Sec. 7(f)4 of Resolution No. 10488, A. De Jesus St in Caloocan. Send us your pictures of illegal campaign materials (with date/time, location) and use #SumbongsaCOMELEC. pic.twitter.com/a7zfga9hfp — COMELEC (@COMELEC) February 15, 2019


An oversized campaign poster for #NLE2019 along Maria Orosa St, Manila. Sec. 6(c) of Reso. No. 10488 says posters made of any material shall not exceed 2 x 3 ft. Send us your pictures of illegal campaign materials (with date/time, location) and use #SumbongsaCOMELEC. pic.twitter.com/PzuWcI9If4 — COMELEC (@COMELEC) February 15, 2019


These were the 40 senatorial candidates whom Guanzon named:

34 plus 6 senatorial candidates have illegal posters as of yesterday. @jabjimenez @dirfrancesarabe @COMELEC pic.twitter.com/jKgxtBtP7o — Rowena V. Guanzon (@commrguanzon) February 15, 2019


Responding to social media users who questioned her, Guanzon later clarified that the list is for candidates' whose addresses are in NCR. Go's address, she said, is in Davao, therefore an election officer in Davao would be the one to notify him of his illegal posters.

Because Bong Go's address is n Davao the Election ofcer or Director of Davao will send him a notice. Not NCR elecrn officer https://t.co/HZXDiys8ec — Rowena V. Guanzon (@commrguanzon) February 15, 2019


Candidate Go will be sent a notice in his home address in Davao. No sacred cows. — Rowena V. Guanzon (@commrguanzon) February 16, 2019


Following this explanation, the other candidates mentioned will be notified by the Comelec officers in their respective regions.

Marcos, who is the governor of Ilocos Norte, is required by law to be a resident of that province for at least one year.

In his 2010 Statement of Election Contributions and Expenditures, Revilla listed his office/residential address as Bacoor, Cavite. He was governor of Cavite from 1998 to 2001.

Meanwhile, Dela Rosa's home province is Davao del Sur. There were speculations that he would run for governor of that province before his senatorial bid.

Under Republic Act No. 9006 or the Fair Elections Act, campaign posters should measure no more than 2 feet by 3 feet. They are not allowed to be posted on public structures like waiting sheds, electric posts and wires, and road traffic signs.

The official campaign period for the 2019 elections started on February 12. – Rappler.com