Makati's 2016 garbage hauling costs lowest since 2007 – COA

MANILA, Philippines – The Makati City government's garbage hauling expenses in 2016 were the lowest since 2007 – a testament to its efforts to reduce waste.

The city audit report released by the Commission on Audit (COA) last Wednesday, August 23, showed that the local government's "environment/sanitary services" expenses went down to P337.807 million ($6.6 million) in 2016. 

This is P108.72 million or 24.35% lower than the P446.523 million ($8.7 million) spent in 2015.

Financial statements also show the 2016 amount is the lowest since 2007, when the Makati City government spent P372.028 million ($7.3 million).

According to state auditors, Makati City's intensive pro-environment programs such as the Urban Greening, Waste Reduction, and Diversification Program, and the enforcement of the Solid Waste Management Code based on the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act, helped the government save money.  

Enacted under Republic Act 9003, the Ecological Solid Waste Management Act orders all local government units to decentralize garbage collection. Barangays are tasked to teach residents how to segregate trash properly. (READ: Garbage law impossible to implement? Look at San Fernando)

Partnerships lauded

The COA report noted that the partnership between barangays and the Makati Environment Cooperative has been "instrumental in the sustained implementation of the barangay waste segregation and waste recovery program." Projects such as color-coded pushcarts, for instance, help monitor collection activities. 

COA also lauded "Basura'y Bawasan, Balik-gamitin at Baguhin ang Anyo sa Pasko" (3B sa Pasko), a program that gives incentives to residents making creative use of recycled products. 

"The [3B sa Pasko] program is among the many notable projects of Makati that aim to effectively reduce the volume of waste generated in the city," state auditors said. "The anti-smoke belching campaign and the anti-smoking ordinances are also continuously implemented." – Rappler.com

P50 = $1