PDP-Laban 'very open' to learn ideology, policy from China's Communist Party

FUJIAN PROVINCE, China – The Philippines’ ruling party, PDP-Laban, is set to learn  from the Communist Party of China (CPC), according to its party president and senior Fujian province officials.

Talking to visiting Filipino journalists in Fujian province in southeastern China, CPC officials said that in December 2016, PDP-Laban agreed to send its members to the CPC party school in the province to undergo "policy training" and to learn about the ways and ideology of the Asian giant’s party.

“For instance, they want to know how the CPC was organized, how they make decisions, how they practice in the CPC, how they work,” a senior provincial official told reporters on Sunday, July 16.

Senate President Aquilino Pimentel III, president of PDP-Laban, also supposedly discussed cooperation for “party-building,” when he met with senior CPC officials in Fujian last month. 

Pimentel was in Fuzhou, the capital of the province, for the BRICS Political Parties, Think-tanks, and Civil Society Organizations Forum 2017.

Asked for comment, Pimentel said it is still in the process of negotiation. He also said there is still no specific program for the training.

“We are still negotiating with them. We need more details about the program but we are very open to availing of it,” Pimentel said in a text message.

Referring to the December agreement, Pimentel added: "We enhance our relationship. We use imagination on how to do it. Wala namang nakalista na specific activities (There are no specific activities listed)."

China visit

China's ruling party has thousands of schools nationwide to train its 80 million members on its ideology, policies, and administration.

During his June visit, Pimentel expressed his admiration for the province, where more than 1 million Filipino-Chinese hail from.

"I am very impressed with Fujian. They are not at the center of the country politically or economically, but they still managed to do very well," he said.

He also urged the Philippine government to follow the economic path of the province. 

"I think that we should look closely at how they were able to develop their economy despite their distance from the capital Beijing, while at the same remaining environment-friendly," he earlier said. – Rappler.com

Camille Elemia

Camille Elemia is Rappler's lead reporter for media, disinformation, and democracy. She won an ILO award in 2017. She received the prestigious Fulbright-Hubert Humphrey fellowship in 2019, allowing her to further study media and politics in the US. Email camille.elemia@rappler.com

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