Syrian, two others arrested for human trafficking

MANILA, Philippines - A Syrian man wanted for human trafficking was arrested in an entrapment operation in Manila on Friday, April 10.

Adulkarim Mohammed Majed, a 31-year-old temporary resident of Imus, Cavite, was caught in a restaurant along Roxas Boulevard by combined members of the Presidential Anti-Organized Crime Commission (PAOCC) and the Philippine National Police (PNP).

The suspect was arrested for violation of the Anti-Trafficking in Persons Act and violation of Republic Act 8402 or the Migrant Workers Act of 1995.

The operation was conducted following complaints that the Syrian was recruiting overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) for non-existent jobs in the United Arab Emirates.

Two Philippine passports owned by complainants as well as important documents were recovered from the suspect.

The arrest was conducted after agents rescued 4 women illegally detained in Barangay Tetuan in Zamboanga City on Monday, April 6. They were held by Nancy Driz who allegedly acted as the facilitator of the Syrian national.

The victims, all residents of Luzon, were recruited through the help of a man alias ‘Mike.’ According to one of the victims, ‘Mike’ was supposed to facilitate their travel to Saudi Arabia through Sandakan, Sabah.

On the same day, the agents arrested 52-year-old Camarudin Nakan Ibrahim alias Kammar inside Medio Hotel in the same city following information from one of the victims.

The suspect yielded an identification card supposedly from the 6th Military Intelligence Battalion and several travel documents as well as fake visas issued to the rescued women, authorities said.

According to CIDG-ATCU chief, Senior Supt. John Guyguyon, the Syrian national failed to present any document from the Department of Labor and Employment (DOLE) giving him authority to recruit and deploy workers to the Middle East. 

The Philippine Overseas Employment Administration (POEA) also certified that he is not a licensed overseas job recruiter in the country, he added. – Rappler.com