Tropical Storm Ramon still barely moving

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MANILA, Philippines – Tropical Storm Ramon (Kalmaegi) remained almost stationary on Friday evening, November 15.

In a briefing past 11 pm on Friday, the Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical, and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA) said Ramon is 430 kilometers east northeast of Casiguran, Aurora, hardly unchanged from its location in the afternoon.

PAGASA Weather Specialist Aldczar Aurelio explained that Ramon is between two high pressure areas which are affecting its movement.

Ramon continues to have maximum winds of 65 kilometers per hour (km/h) and gustiness of up to 80 km/h.

The same areas are under a tropical cyclone wind signal.

Signal No. 1 (winds of 30 km/h to 60 km/h)

Parts of Luzon and the Visayas are expected to experience rain from Ramon during the weekend.

Saturday, November 16

Sunday, November 17

The rain caused by Ramon could trigger flash floods and landslides, warned PAGASA. (READ: FAST FACTS: Tropical cyclones, rainfall advisories)

PAGASA added that gusty conditions may persist in Northern Luzon on Saturday, November 16, especially in coastal and mountainous areas, due to the northeast monsoon or hanging amihan.

Travel is also risky, especially for small vessels, in the seaboards of areas under Signal No. 1, the seaboards of Northern Luzon, and the eastern seaboards of Central Luzon and Southern Luzon.

Based on Ramon's latest forecast track, it could make landfall in Cagayan on Monday, November 18.

Its exit from the Philippine Area of Responsibility might be on Wednesday, November 20.

Forecast track of Tropical Storm Ramon (Kalmaegi) as of November 15, 2019, 11 pm. Image from PAGASA

Forecast track of Tropical Storm Ramon (Kalmaegi) as of November 15, 2019, 11 pm.

Image from PAGASA

Ramon is the Philippines' 18th tropical cyclone for 2019, and the 2nd for November. (READ: LIST: PAGASA's names for tropical cyclones in 2019)

The country gets an average of 20 tropical cyclones annually, but since 2019 is an El Niño year, only 14 to 18 tropical cyclones are expected.

Below is the estimated number of tropical cyclones for the last two months of 2019:

PAGASA declared the start of the rainy season last June 14. – Rappler.com