SC orals on Marcos burial: Issues and answers

MANILA, Philippines – Three decades after toppling the dictatorship of Ferdinand Marcos, the Philippines has yet to settle the debate on whether the late president deserves to be buried at the Libingan ng mga Bayani (Heroes' Cemetery).

At 10 am on Wednesday, August 31, the Supreme Court (SC) will hear arguments from the groups that have petitioned against President Rodrigo Duterte’s order to allow a military interment for Marcos, as well as from the government and Marcos sides.

The High Court earlier issued a status quo ante order on the burial until September 12. 

Six petitions – since consolidated into one case – have been filed before the SC by groups made up of activists and Martial Law victims.

The respondents named in the petitions are the heirs of Marcos, Executive Secretary Salvador Medialdea, Deputy Chief of Staff of the military’s Reservist and Retiree Affairs Rear Armiral Ernesto Enriquez, Armed Forces of the Philippines Chief of Staff General Ricardo Visaya, Defense Secretary Delfin Lorenzana, and Philippine Veterans Affairs Office (PVAO) Administrator Lieutenant General Ernesto Carolina.

They are all represented by Solicitor General Jose Calida.

Rappler lists here the issues raised by the petitioners against the burial of the late dictator at the national shrine, followed by counter-arguments submitted by the Solicitor General.

 

The 1987 Constitution   

Petitioners

Respondents

 

Republic Act 289: An Act Providing for the Construction of a National Pantheon for Presidents of the Philippines, National Heroes and Patriots of the Country

Petitioners

Respondents

 

Republic Act 10368: Human Rights Victims Reparations Act

Petitioners

Respondents

 

Marcos family’s 1992 agreement with then president Fidel Ramos

Petitioners

Respondents

 

International Covenant of Civil and Political Rights

Petitioners

Respondents

 

Marcos’ military records

Petitioners

Respondents

– Rappler.com

Patty Pasion

Patty leads the Rappler+ membership program. She used to be a Rappler multimedia reporter who covered politics, labor, and development issues of vulnerable sectors.

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