The search for the first web page

MANILA, Philippines - A web manager at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is looking for a floppy disk. To be specific, Dan Noyes, CERN's web manager, is looking for the floppy disk that housed the very first version of the first web page.

The National Public Radio reports that while the first web page is online now, the draft of this first website, which was made by Tim Berners-Lee in 1990, has gone missing. That earliest version of the web page was lost at a conference in California.

Noyes added, "It was such a beautiful object, that optical disk, that someone maybe has it on their coffee table or their bookshelf, and if we could find that, that'd be great."

Following the NPR report, CNET noted that someone does have an earlier version of the first web page, though it isn't the mythical floppy disk being looked for.

University of North Carolina professor Paul Jones tweeted CERN, saying that he actually had an online copy of an older version of the world's first web page. Jones' version comes from CERN's WWW team and was a demonstration made during the Hypertext '91 conference in San Antonio, Texas.

.@ thefirstwebsite I have a copy of the page that @ timberners_lee used to present at Hypertext 91 ibiblio.org/pjones/old.pag… others on my cube — Paul Jones (@smalljones) May 23, 2013

If you happened to pick up a floppy disk while at a conference in California in 1990, you may just have an important bit of web history in your hands. - Rappler.com

Victor Barreiro Jr.

Victor Barreiro Jr is part of Rappler's Central Desk. An avid patron of role-playing games and science fiction and fantasy shows, he also yearns to do good in the world, and hopes his work with Rappler helps to increase the good that's out there.

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